Italian police pull stunt to celebrate the Turin Shroud on display

Detectives claim to have revealed how Jesus Christ looked as a child – based on computer forensics and the Shroud of Turin. Yes, it really is as totally ridiculous as it sounds.

Italian police ‘reveal’ what Jesus looked like as a young boy

Using the Turin Shroud, the supposed burial cloth of Jesus, police investigators have generated a photo-fit image from the negative facial image on the material. And from this they reversed the ageing process to create an image of a young Jesus, by reducing the size of the jaw, raising the chin and straightening the nose.

Evidence is clear that this is not actually the burial cloth of Christ. The image does not align to an actual face covering (which would be distorted, not this perfect, almost like a painting… hmm). This view of Jesus is similar to cultural depictions of the 13th century – from when the cloth was dated.

So, this new image of the boy Jesus was extrapolated from an adult image on a piece of cloth that is more the work of an artist than a real-life depiction. It’s not even doubtful, it’s just all around bogus.

Unsurprisingly, there is a TV show on the way featuring this image and its derivation. The shroud is currently on display of the Shroud at Turin Cathedral.

James Randi views the Shroud on a recent trip to Italy. "This huge rag -- so thoroughly and authoritatively discredited by experts as even originating during the life of Christ -- was guarded every 15 feet or so by garishly-costumed volunteers who glowered at me, perhaps because I so resembled a rabbi, but since the terrain was very bumpy I was given a wheelchair and was thereby had a very close-up view of the relic... I was far more fascinated by the hushed faithful who stood in reverent silence before it as the commentary droned on. It was the first time I'd had a chance to see this fascinating object. and so very up close. I found the experience very interesting indeed..." Photo: Roberta Baria

James Randi views the Shroud on a recent trip to Italy: “This huge rag — so thoroughly and authoritatively discredited by experts as even originating during the life of Christ — was guarded every 15 feet or so by garishly-costumed volunteers … I was given a wheelchair and was thereby had a very close-up view of the relic… I was far more fascinated by the hushed faithful who stood in reverent silence before it … It was the first time I’d had a chance to see this fascinating object. and so very up close. I found the experience very interesting indeed…” Photo: Roberta Baria

  10 comments for “Italian police pull stunt to celebrate the Turin Shroud on display

  1. CimPy
    May 5, 2015 at 7:44 PM

    Doh, I did hear of this in recent days, and also I heared (again, it is not new but reproposed) the piezonuclear absurdity related to a 9 Richter earthquake that should have done no damage but should have made the Shroud younger of about 1 thousand (and a couple of centuries) younger as per C14 analisys (which dated it at around 1300 dc, when this kind of mystical artifacts appeared for first time…).
    What to say, the time of show is coming, so there is a bit of publicity about it: you do not want it to pass away unnoticed, want you?
    😀

  2. Eve
    May 6, 2015 at 1:10 AM

    The “boy Jesus” image isn’t new. The New York Times ran a story about it in December 2004.

  3. Mike C.
    May 6, 2015 at 9:01 AM

    Jesus is a myth anyway. There’s no direct evidence that he existed. How could there not be direct evidence to so important a religious figure?

  4. ChristineRose
    May 6, 2015 at 12:42 PM

    I’m not sure how anyone could have done this without noticing that the face on the shroud has impossible proportions, not even corresponding to any genetic condition that I’m aware of–although it does correspond to conventions of gothic sculpture.

  5. Richard
    May 6, 2015 at 2:34 PM

    I was at a party YEARS ago when a Wayne State University art major demonstrated with a piece of paper and a magic marker how the face would be distorted (by draping the paper over the face of someone lying on their back and marking where the eyes, nose, forehead, ears etc. end up) if the shroud were a burial cloth and not a portrait. I’ve been amazed ever since that people latch onto carbon dating and the weave of the cloth & its fiber content and how the image was “burned” onto the material and miss that simple demonstration ….

    And it IS a Gothic representation of a face, like something carved onto a column, and certainly does not resemble what a Middle-Eastern male of Jewish descent would probably have looked like.

  6. Eric
    May 6, 2015 at 5:30 PM

    I can’t agree with this statement at all.

    Christianity (and Jesus) was not a major religious movement until hundreds of years after Jesus’ supposed death. He was a very minor blip during his life and not a major figure.

    Many many historic figures would have to be considered “myth” by your standard. I’m atheist and do not believe in the “son of god” thing, miracles, etc etc but do believe that there is a high likelihood that Jesus the human being was a historic person.

  7. Bill T
    May 9, 2015 at 11:29 AM

    Ignore facts that counter your claim, over-emphasize your weak points, it’s easy to remain deluded. (NOT “you”, you understand).

  8. Michael
    June 17, 2015 at 11:21 PM

    I am not taking sides on whether this relic is real or not. However, there is possible clues to why the cloth dates from the middle ages. After a fire in the cathedral nuns, sewed the original shroud with patches to prevent further damage. In addition, pollen sample studies done, showed they coincided with plants of the Jerusalem area. Dates previously done on other areas of the shroud were in fact in line with the first century (type of linen and C14 dating). Lastly, a Catholic does not have to believe in the relic. The church, after it’s investigation simply states the object is that which in this case is the burial cloth of Christ. In medieval times there was much forgery and in recent times where authenticity can not be proven to a reasonable extent relics have been removed from exhibition.

    OK another last thing, James Randi although a non-believer was at the least respectful during his visit. Something people should remember -if anything other than respect for the culture.

  9. Michael
    June 17, 2015 at 11:35 PM

    I was trying to clarify some issues. The dating of the shroud to the 13th century also coincides with a fire in which nuns patched the holes with linen of the day. Dating of the original shroud itself was denied until recently due to the need to destroy small samples of the cloth. Additional samples from other areas of the shroud also had discrepancies that showed the linen to really be from the first century AD as well as the pattern of weaving and pollen. Believers will believe, Non-believers will not….. period. Even if the data showed the object as a genuine first century artifact you can not convince everyone and that is fine. Believers take it on faith. I think I may be becoming a believer,,,,

  10. June 18, 2015 at 9:18 AM

    That’s not quite right. Nonbelievers may very well be using the best evidence available to conclude that the shroud is not the real deal but a piece of art. At least that’s my take on it. When you make excuses about the dating results that’s called special pleading which is an effort to rescue your personal interpretation from the evidence.

    The bottom line is that it currently makes no sense on several fronts that this is the burial cloth of Jesus. But yes, believers will believe anyway.

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