Lottery winner gives credit to amusement park psychic

Media treats this windfall story with utmost credulity, noting that the winner was once told by a psychic reader that she would win the lottery. Oh really…?

Ex-NYPD cop is first New Yorker to win $1,000 per day for life – NY Daily News.

A retired NYPD cop considers her new lottery jackpot divine — in a supernatural sense.

Edna Aguayo of Ozone Park, Queens, is the city’s first person to win $1,000 a day for the rest of her life through New York Lottery’s Cash4Life game.

The retired transit cop, 51, said her path to riches started at an amusement park more than 16 years ago when a fortune teller predicted her win.

“I was in an amusement park and went to see a reader. She told me to buy ‘for life’ lottery tickets because she could see that one day I was going to hit a ‘for life’ prize,” she said in a statement issued by lottery officials.

Unfortunately the New York Daily News do not seem to even question Aguayo’s claim, seemingly taking her story at face value. There is no way to tell if this ever happened. What if she had a dream that it happened but now it seems as if it was reality? Our memories are NOTORIOUSLY bad especially at accurately retrieving past events.

But if it did happen, how are we to know the psychic didn’t say the same thing to everyone else who paid her $2. Such psychics have a tendency to tell young women how many kids they will have or what their future lives will be like. Once in a while, the hits happen. It would actually be weird if it didn’t. But the lottery is a really poor bet.  Lots more plunk down their money every week only to lose it repeatedly and NEVER win.

Stories like this sadly encourage superstitious and irrational belief.

Photo credit:

Edna Aguayo receives her history making lottery prize. Photo credit:New York State Gaming Commission

Tip: Ray Gorman

  10 comments for “Lottery winner gives credit to amusement park psychic

  1. RayG
    July 25, 2014 at 3:32 PM

    As I mentioned- why isn’t the lottery being won by psychics every week?

    • July 25, 2014 at 5:48 PM

      They say they can’t foresee things for themselves.

  2. July 25, 2014 at 3:44 PM

    I suspect such reporters feel their job is to report what was said without question, and not inject their own “biases” and such. I’ve heard innumerable times, even when interviewing politicians making outrageous statements, “why didn’t the reporter push back on that point?”

    With this “just the facts, ma’am” attitude, reporters are bound to be the next group of workers to be replaced by computers.

    OTOH, sometimes a point CAN be made in newspapers, even if it’s not in the words used – the caption of this photograph is perfectly ordinary and describes the woman’s complaint in a few words, but the photo tells the full story and is what made it go viral ten years ago:
    http://www.snopes.com/photos/signs/pregnant.asp

  3. smh
    July 25, 2014 at 4:27 PM

    A broken clock is right twice a day -way better track record than psychics. ;)

  4. busterggi
    July 25, 2014 at 4:34 PM

    More than sixteen years until the ‘prophesy’ came true? Good thing it didn’t happen on the last day of her life.

  5. Jim Price
    July 25, 2014 at 4:42 PM

    I’m just glad she’s now an “ex” cop. People that gullible shouldn’t be cops. Of course, transit cops are little more than glorified meter maids.

  6. Lukas
    July 26, 2014 at 12:01 AM

    The problem with the story is besides in article are these. If the person was buying tickets for more then 16 years there is a good possibility he could have won one day, people win in lottery one day or another if they bet and there is nothing paranormal in it. It happens but he spend more money on the tickets maybe then he won in the end. Even the text claims that the person was buying the tickets for more then 16 years:

    “The retired transit cop, 51, said her path to riches started at an amusement park more than 16 years ago when a fortune teller predicted her win.”

    Second problem it is so vague that it makes me want to laugh. She told him that he will win and should buy some tickets but nothing more. No given date, no given numbers, no nothing. Many people even in the lottery business will tell you this that keep buying the tickets and one day you will win. This is such a weak prediction that it makes me laugh. Here is the text again:

    “I was in an amusement park and went to see a reader. She told me to buy ‘for life’ lottery tickets because she could see that one day I was going to hit a ‘for life’ prize,” she said in a statement issued by lottery officials.

    The last question is why did not the psychic won the money?? She should have been the winer and not him.

    • Lukas
      July 26, 2014 at 12:05 AM

      Opps made a typo:

      The last question is why did not the psychic won the money?? S I meant to say that the winner should be psychic and not her(the cop) if the psychic has such powers.

  7. July 26, 2014 at 6:29 AM

    Can anyone help me find the press coverage of psychics who gave the wrong numbers? As far as I can tell this is what happens in virtually every case (hence the obvious dearth of multi-millionaire lottery wining psychics), yet it never makes the papers. Why is that, I wonder?

    • RayG
      July 28, 2014 at 10:19 AM

      Better luck using the numbers inside Fortune cookies. Psychics wouldn’t give exact numbers to play, only to play. You win a dollar- “They’re right!!!”

      But I remember a story from awhile ago that there were hundreds of winners on a big jackpot because they played the fortune cookie numbers. And to be honest, I have more faith in that old man in the back of the fortune cookie company coming up with those numbers than I do a ‘psychic’…

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