Hearing a place is haunted gives you no rights to “check it out”

These guys don’t strike me as typical “ghost hunters”, they seem more like none-too-smart, out-for-a-thrill bored kids. Anyway, just because a place is supposedly haunted does not give you any additional rights to “investigate” it. Or unlawfully break in as happened here.

Three arrested for breaking into ‘haunted house’ – KAIT-Jonesboro, AR

Three men on a ghost adventure Tuesday night didn’t find haunted spirits. But, deputies found them.

Tamerius Johnson, 19; Brooks Edwards, 18; and Anthony Milligan, 19, are charged with felony breaking and entering.

According to the initial incident report from the Craighead County Sheriff’s Department, the three men broke into a vacant house in the 500-block of County Road 339 believing it was “haunted.”

A neighbor called police. One was caught still in the house while the others made a run for to be captured later. Youthful indescrition? Maybe. But the premise of “haunted” is a draw for thrill seekers out to scare themselves. It encourages vandalism as we’ve seen many times before.

More like this:

Ghostbusted for breaking and entering

Ghost hunter vandalism: Hard to keep trespassers out of Wolfe Manor when the curiousity is high

The Conjuring is a REAL nightmare for people living in the house

Ghost hunting group destroys historic mansion

  8 comments for “Hearing a place is haunted gives you no rights to “check it out”

  1. Tony Selletti
    May 22, 2014 at 10:55 AM

    This reported haunted school was a target of urban explores and ghost hunters. Read what happened to it.http://www.myfoxphilly.com/story/25108922/fire-tears-through-abandoned-school-in-delaware-county#.U34JQRkuv98.facebook

    • May 22, 2014 at 11:01 AM

      There is no direct link to ghost hunters. It could have been homeless people using the space. There are other examples of fires like Emmitt House and Fort Mifflin but those also can’t be directly tied to paranormal vandalism.

  2. Chris Howard
    May 22, 2014 at 10:55 AM

    AND it’s not that difficult to ask for permission.

    My wife runs, and writes, The Haunted Tourist and she ALWAYS asks permission to do photo shoots, and on site inspections.

    It just requires patience, respect for others, and a little forethought.

    We’re currently waiting to hear back from the railroad to see if we can get on site for the Goatman of Pope Lick story (big nod to Doubtful on that, thanks!).

    Anyhow, their PR & legal departments are usually pretty fast to reply, and if they say no then that’s when the respect part comes into play. You then just have to come at the story from a different angle. No big deal.

    If it’s a residence we inform them that it will bring attention to their property, some of which may be unwanted, and negative. Then, again, respect THEIR decision.

  3. spookyparadigm
    May 22, 2014 at 11:18 AM

    Would also be a nifty excuse if one were out copper scrounging.

  4. Angela
    May 22, 2014 at 12:23 PM

    This is an older one from 2011, but it inspired a friend of mine and I to double check the locations for confirmation that they gave permission when paranormal teams post their pictures. This team was busted out because they could not resist posting their exploits on Facebook.

    http://www.pahomepage.com/story/facebook-helps-police-find-criminals/d/story/fqJcuy8uLUuZSTEYMx-FSQ

    • Angela
      May 22, 2014 at 12:28 PM

      **oh to clarify–the woman and her daughter joined our Facebook paranormal discussion group a couple of years ago. The daughter was the founder of their paranormal team. Needless to say when they were questioned about this, they promptly left the group.

      • May 22, 2014 at 1:31 PM

        Hilarity.

Comments are closed.