First conspiracy book appears about missing plane MH370

You knew this was coming… the speculation about what happened to MH370 in book form. It’s a sickening ploy for money, not answers.

First book on MH370 mystery blames US war games.

Seventy-one days after Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 disappeared, the first book about the disaster will go on sale on Monday with a theory about what might have happened.

Flight MH370 The Mystery, which is made available by NewSouth Books in Sydney, doesn’t claim to have any answers but to some extent supports the theory that the aircraft may have been accidentally shot down during a joint Thai-US military exercise in the South China Sea. Searchers were then possibly led in the wrong direction to cover up the mistake, it suggests.

“It suggests…” Anyone could suggest anything. Sadly, many people have a hard time judging evidence from made-up speculation and will take this as rational. Will aliens or wormhole be next? Will people eat this stuff up or rightfully throw it in the rubbish bin? Will MH370 become one of the world’s great unsolved mysteries that will spawn a hundred kooky fringe explanations? Probably. That’s the way these things usually go. It wouldn’t be bad if people understood this is baseless. But that’s not what happens. They will take it seriously, no doubt. We’ve seen it for every catastrophe in the past decade (and beyond).

Commenters on the book say it’s too soon. No one knows what happened yet. To speculate without evidence is irresponsible, not “sceptical”, as the author says. “Skepticism” is based on evidence there is currently not enough to make a conclusion on this. Even if the bottom line is “I don’t know but maybe this insane story is true,” that’s so blatantly a money grab.

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  14 comments for “First conspiracy book appears about missing plane MH370

  1. Angela
    May 19, 2014 at 10:06 AM

    Just checked the author’s Wikipedia page. Looking at some of his other publications, this does not surprise me.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nigel_Cawthorne

    • Rex Dart
      May 19, 2014 at 11:00 AM

      He sounds like a writer in the vein of (fictional creation) Garth Marenghi: “I’m one of the few people you’ll meet who’s written more books than they’ve read.”

      • May 19, 2014 at 1:24 PM

        More like Ed Reardon. I wonder if he wrote an episode of “Tenko”?

  2. Bill T.
    May 19, 2014 at 11:03 AM

    The unscrupulous exploiting the paranoid and gullible, I’ve never heard of such a thing before. What next, women with big hair in Long Island duping the recently bereaved? Never!

  3. Peter Robinson
    May 19, 2014 at 11:13 AM

    Will it be available at all good airport booksellers?

  4. Bob
    May 19, 2014 at 12:17 PM

    I seem to remember within the first month a self-published amazon book about the disappearance. But that was, like, weeks ago, and I have the attention span of a rabbit.

  5. Ken C
    May 19, 2014 at 2:21 PM
  6. Judy
    May 19, 2014 at 2:31 PM
    • L. Barth
      May 19, 2014 at 9:36 PM

      I don’t want to watch the video. What is the supposed reason?

    • Sindigo
      May 20, 2014 at 7:39 AM

      With 200 people involved, you’ll always find a motive. Hell, I expect that would be true with 5 people.

  7. Dubious F
    May 19, 2014 at 3:17 PM

    It seems that in this age of internet and instant gratification of posting of comments and speculation, the facts are being distorted and a lot of people take them at face value and don’t question the data. According to: http://www.bloomberg.com/infographics/2014-03-13/vanishing-planes-mapped-since-1948.html , mh370 is far of being the first mystery but maybe the first to fuel the “speculatinternet”. That book is probably a compendium of of all those delusions. Fact is: we can’t find it now

    • Headless Unicorn Guy
      May 24, 2014 at 5:51 PM

      And the circumstances of its loss/disappearance have a high Mystery/Weirdness factor.
      And High Weirdness Factor fuels High Weirdness Speculations (STENDEC… STENDEC… STENDEC…)

  8. Judy
    May 19, 2014 at 3:17 PM
  9. RandyRandy
    May 19, 2014 at 7:28 PM

    Godzilla, on holiday in Sourh China Sea, has reflexive reaction to wayward Malaysia Air passenger plane, toasts it to cinders.
    Case solved.

    Surely all these legends of Japanese mega monsters, and even the saga of Monster Island, must have some root origin in historical fact.

    Or not!

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