It’s just a piece of broken rock, not a jelly donut

In an update to the Mars rock story, NASA actually DID study it. (So we can throw out this frivolous lawsuit) and solved the mystery.

Mystery of Mars ‘doughnut rock’ solved.

The “jelly doughnut” rock that seemed to appear out of nowhere on Mars last month did not fall out of an extraterrestrial pastry box.

The rock had been mysterious to scientists because Mars rover Opportunity photographed it in a spot where the rock had not been present just four days earlier. Steve Squyres, lead scientist of the Mars Exploration Rover mission, described it as a white rock with a dark red low spot in the middle. The rock, more than 1.5 inches wide, was named Pinnacle Island.

Researchers now say Pinnacle Island is a piece of a larger rock, which Opportunity broke and moved with its wheel in early January. Further images from the rover reveal the original rock that the rover’s wheel must have struck.

No, that’s not as exciting as if the rock had crawled into view on its own or been dropped there by aliens. But now that this puzzle has been solved, the rover team plans to drive Opportunity south and uphill to look at exposed rock layers on a slope.

Photo credit: NASA

Photo credit: NASA

Bummer it wasn’t a donut.
The Colbert Report (may be location restricted)

  2 comments for “It’s just a piece of broken rock, not a jelly donut

  1. Richard Smith
    February 17, 2014 at 2:57 PM

    Ich bin kein Berliner, ich bin ein Marsgestein.

  2. Rand
    February 17, 2014 at 4:10 PM

    Maybe I’m missing something, but those two “side-by-side” photographs do not (to me at least) appear to be pictures of the same location…. the cracks in the bedrock do not line up….

    So, I’m a bit confused as to what the mystery is all about?

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