Anti-vax and psychic claims lead to worst story you will read in a while

I feel it was outrageously irresponsible for this media outlet to run this story. Not only are they allowing misrepresentation of vaccines, they present psychic information as valid, and one questionable medical opinion as trumping the entire body of vaccine safety. There is zero mention of the safeguards in place and the overall efficacy of vaccines.

Family seeks a medium’s help after 10-month old child dies – FOX 10 News | myfoxphoenix.com.

A 10-month-old girl died last May — a victim of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome — or so said investigators.

But did something else kill Haylee?

She received a Hepatitis-B vaccine just hours before she died, creating uncertainty her mother and grandmother couldn’t live with, so her family sought more answers.

The medical report said SIDS. From science-based medicine site:

SIDS is the leading cause of death in children aged one month to one year in the United States, affecting roughly 2,000 infants annually, and is about as bad as it comes in the world of pediatrics. Although there are risk factors, even some modifiable ones, there is no way to effectively predict which infants are at high risk. There is no screening test for SIDS and we simply do not have a firm grasp of why it occurs in some children and not others, or of the underlying pathophysiology.

To meet the strict diagnostic criteria of SIDS, an autopsy, death scene investigation and review of the clinical history must be performed. These are all very important steps in the process because there are a number of medical conditions, such as abuse, accidental suffocation, and a variety of underlying disease processes, which can mimic SIDS. As our diagnostic capabilities have improved over the past few decades, a large number of deaths that would have been classified as SIDS are now attributed to one of these other conditions. That and the success of science-based public health campaigns like the “Back to Sleep” initiative have led to a dramatic decrease in the incidence of SIDS since the early 90’s.

The fact that SIDS occurs about half as frequently than it did in 1992, however, is no consolation to the parents of a deceased child. The unexpected death of a young child without a satisfactory explanation is a tragedy that is hard for those who have not experienced it to wrap their heads around. Having to tell a family that there is no explanation, leaving them to potentially blame themselves despite our best efforts to educate them otherwise, is one of the most challenging and painful aspects of pediatric medicine.

The family didn’t accept the conclusions. They were bereft, as is understandable. What is not understandable is why anyone could believe a psychic can communicate with a dead 10 month old child.

“Something was causing her throat to close up,” said Debra.

“I am having trouble breathing,” said Debbie.

“I kept having a hard time breathing,” said Debra.
“It was like a light bulb went on.. it was like oh my gosh.. your daughter is telling me it was a shot that killed her,” said Debra.

Kallie added, “We knew it was the shot, but we needed to hear it from Haylee and she came through and told us it was the shot.”

They then hired their own professional to review the autopsy report and he determined it was sub-par and that “Haylee showed “features of a generalized allergic response most likely from the vaccination that was given earlier in the day.” This is what the article says. What you can not tell is that if this doctor was qualified and if, since he did not do the autopsy, if he can actually make this determination. However, “His report showed that it was absolutely the shot,” said Debbie. I’d bet it showed no such thing and he can not make that determination anyway.

But they go further, saying that the psychic connection was the key – the little girl solved her own mystery. And the family, regardless of the sources in the story noting that adverse reactions to vaccines are rare, wants to “spread the word”.

I feel sick after reading this. Not only did a baby die but her family has gone off the edge of reason and the media is allowing a platform for this appallingly ridiculous claim that a psychic helped solve a medical mystery and that people should avoid vaccines for their children. That’s insanity.

If Haylee’s death is suspected to be related to vaccinations, there is a process should be undertaken to correctly document it and get restitution. That is the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System. (VAERS) NO MENTION OF THIS IS ANYWHERE IN THE ARTICLE.

Instead, at the bottom there is a link to the psychic.

More: Vaccines work. Period..

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  3 comments for “Anti-vax and psychic claims lead to worst story you will read in a while

  1. Sally Barnes
    February 22, 2014 at 6:58 PM

    This is just disgusting behaviour. Vaccines are essential for the health of our children and future generations and for this…parasite to claim it was that that killed her – clearly pushing her OWN agenda – is vile in the extreme. What the hell is wrong with these people?

    Hell, my youngest is higher functioning autistic but I know damn well it wasn’t the MMR jab she had that caused it, it’s something as much a part of her as her hair and eye colour. That’s just morally reprehensible though. I’m really starting to think the gene pool could use a little chlorine.

  2. DanielAG
    February 26, 2014 at 12:13 PM

    No one, even an M.D., can determine an alternate cause of death just by reading an autopsy report, in a case where the actual published cause, SIDS, is equivalent to “unknown”, but many people do not know this, so they are misled by FOX, which did not report any response from qualified pathologists to the “independent expert” . As for Sally Barnes’s comment, the chlorine belongs on FOX News for immorally incomplete reporting.

  3. Funkstronaut
    March 1, 2014 at 1:21 PM

    For some reason, I found this article making the FaceBook rounds, today (a week after it was run).
    I couldn’t believe what I was reading. I expect some small level of professionalism from Fox journalism, but this article was beyond irresponsible. Honestly, I had to use all my ninja Google skills to confirm if the article was a horrible joke, or not. Apparently it is not, and currently the most despicable excuse for journalism typed on electronic fishwrap I have ever witnessed.
    Brought me to “Doubtful News”, though. Looks pretty cool. I think I’ll poke around for a few minutes.

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