Really not sincerely dead, yet

We cover lots of stories here about people who were THOUGHT to be dead but recovered in a seemingly miraculous way. Scientists are studying what happens at death to the body and brain.

Scientists looking closer at what happens when body dies – Story.

Scientists are stretching the boundaries of understanding what happens as the body dies – and learning more about ways to perhaps interrupt the process, which takes longer than we might suppose.

Death is the final outcome for 100 percent of patients. But there’s growing evidence that revival is possible for at least some patients whose hearts and lungs have stopped working for many minutes, even hours. And brain death – when the brain irreversibly ceases function — is also proving less open and shut.

Defining brain death is becoming more complex as researchers find signs of activity in both human and animal subjects whose brain waves at first show they’ve “flat-lined” to the point that there is no brain function. While some doctors use the EEG as a final check for signs of life in the brain, most rely on a series of reflex and respiration tests given over several hours to determine brain death.

What does sudden cooling do to preserve the body and brain? When is true brain death? The article also mentions a familiar name, Dr. Sam Parnia, who tests for activity after death. Intriguing stuff that deserves to be studied. Death is not closing the book but perhaps a slow drain. Can we reverse it?

Doctor says your consciousness lives on for at least a while after “death” | Doubtful News.

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  5 comments for “Really not sincerely dead, yet

  1. eddi
    December 22, 2013 at 2:10 AM

    When I was a kid (1950s) no heartbeat=dead. Now the time between the appearance of death (no breathing, heart action etc) and actually dead (EEG flatlined) is usually minutes and can end up being hours. Better treatments and equipment make a difference. And the gap will keep widening. Humans may not be able to survive all trauma or disease even in the future, but we’re getting harder to kill permanently.

  2. One Eyed Jack
    December 22, 2013 at 3:12 AM

    Like Sheldon Cooper, I’m waiting for a robotic body to transfer my consciousness to. Bow before me, mortals.

    • December 22, 2013 at 12:29 PM

      Careful what you wish for or you could end up like Herbie or Twiki.

  3. December 22, 2013 at 10:51 PM

    Just how long can you be “dead” and still be revived? These stories tend to suggest a real possibility of the “suspended animation” speculated for use in interstellar (sub-FTL) spaceflight.

  4. Chris Howard
    December 24, 2013 at 6:46 PM

    “I feel happy!”

    That’s the only Python reference you’ll get from me until 2014.

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