Leftover Links for 8 July 2013

Got a couple of leftovers for you this evening.

Frontiers | “What about building 7?” A social psychological study of online discussion of 9/11 conspiracy theories | Frontiers in Personality Science and Individual Differences.

Kountze man keeps bird-snake ‘monster’ in century-old pickle jar – Beaumont Enterprise.

Antarctica’s hidden Lake Vostok found to teem with life – NBC News.com.

South Africa Wants to Sell Its Rhino Horns | LiveScience.

Mindscapes: First man to hear people before they speak – health – 04 July 2013 – New Scientist.

Phuket NEWS: Phantom sex noises in Phuket, voodoo suspected.

From XKCD today.

settled

idoubtit

Editor and owner of Doubtful News. Writer, specializing in science and society, science policy and education. 

  4 comments for “Leftover Links for 8 July 2013

  1. Chris Howard
    July 9, 2013 at 10:59 AM

    Just out of curiosity, does anyone know how long conspiracy theory has been studied by sociologists, and psychologists?

    I seem to remember a time when the social sciences didn’t pay much attention to conspiracy theorists, and the subsequent theories.

  2. Chris Howard
    July 9, 2013 at 11:06 AM

    Ummm, can anyone pronounce “Phuket”? Because if its pronounced the way I think it’s pronounced then I’m not too surprised that the residents are hearing “sex noises”

  3. July 9, 2013 at 11:54 AM

    Chris, the locals pronounce it fooKet. Although the pronunciation you are imaging is probably more appropriate, since it is a sex tourist destination.

    The place is great fun even without participating in the sexual shenanigans. Where else can you ride Go Carts fast enough to kill you, fire fully automatic weapons at defenseless vegetables and go for a 2 hour para sailing adventure all in the same day for under 60 bucks. Then lounge at a bar on the beach, get drunk on Mai Tais in Pineapple tumblers and play Jenga while watching the sun set over the ocean. Paradise.

  4. spookyparadigm
    July 9, 2013 at 7:42 PM

    I think sociological interest in conspiracy theory pretty much starts with Hofstadter. There is interest in similar topics a few years earlier, such as Festinger et al’s When Prophecy fails, but that was about UFO contactee apocalypticism and not specifically conspiracy theory, and at the the time the two were not synonymous.

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