Rotting carcasses fall from the sky

This story was too odd to pass up for many reasons. First, it’s from the Great Falls Tribune. Great Falls indeed.

The aliens didn’t drop them from their spaceships. Humans did. Time to feed the bears.

Roadkill falling from the sky: Alberta wildlife officials deliver carcasses using helicopters | Great Falls Tribune

In the animal kingdom, it’s about as close to “meals on wheels” as one could imagine. Grizzlies, high in the Alberta Rockies and now emerging from hibernation, are on the receiving end of an airlifted smorgasbord.

Helicopters shuttle roadkill carcasses to denning areas still blanketed in deep snow. And with an average of one big game animal run over every day along nearby highways, a fair-share of hefty elk and moose are mixed among dozens of dead deer to make up a varied menu.

Collected by highway maintenance crews and held in cold storage by the Alberta fish and wildlife branch, the partially frozen bodies are slung below choppers and dropped near denning areas along the Eastern Slope between the Montana border and the Crowsnest Pass.

It’s a BEAR BUFFET! It’s a good but expensive use of carcasses with the aim of protecting farmer’s livestock from bear predation.

I could not help but find this insanely amusing, though, when I thought of the head scratching that would occur should someone come across an impact-damaged carcass in the middle of nowhere. Quite Fortean. But it actually HAS a perfectly logical explanation.

Comments are tightly moderated. Please follow the Comment Policy.
This is not a forum or free-for-all. Only thoughtful additions and pertinent opinions will be approved.

  2 comments for “Rotting carcasses fall from the sky

  1. RDW
    May 11, 2013 at 9:52 AM

    I saw a similar type of think done for young Eagles on PBS quite a while back. In that instance, it was just laid out on the ground and the Eagles had learned to come and enjoy the free meal. Learning to catch fish and other prey is not an easy task, and frequently young Eagles will starve to death before they acquire the ability to fend for themselves. I’d certainly not want to be standing under a falling Moose, though.

  2. May 11, 2013 at 3:38 PM

    Think how many bigfoots this will attract!

Comments are closed.