Obama letter suspect believed he had uncovered conspiracy to sell body parts

Um… what?

Miss. mail suspect described body-parts conspiracy

A Mississippi man accused of mailing letters with suspected ricin to national leaders believed he had uncovered a conspiracy to sell human body parts on the black market and sometimes performed as an Elvis Presley impersonator.

Paul Kevin Curtis, 45, was arrested Wednesday at his home in Corinth, near the Tennessee state line about 50 miles north of Presley’s birthplace in Tupelo.

The author wrote the conspiracy that began when he “discovered a refrigerator full of dismembered body parts & organs wrapped in plastic in the morgue of the largest non-metropolitan healthcare organization in the United States of America.”

Curtis wrote that he was trying to “expose various parties within the government, FBI, police departments” for what he believed was “a conspiracy to ruin my reputation in the community as well as an ongoing effort to break down the foundation I worked more than 20 years to build in the country music scene.”

The FBI said there was no indication of a connection between the letters and the Monday bombing in Boston that killed three people and injured more than 170. The letters to Obama and Wicker were postmarked April 8, before the marathon.

So…”Kevin Curtis, Master of Impressions” is responsible for this? A YouTube channel under this name has dozens of videos of him performing as different famous musicians, including Elvis Presley, Buddy Holly and Kid Rock. Apparently, he’s had some issues with his business and the government.

This shook out very quickly and much more oddly than expected.

More: From Washington Post

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  6 comments for “Obama letter suspect believed he had uncovered conspiracy to sell body parts

  1. April 18, 2013 at 12:56 PM

    It doesn’t surprise me that an irrational action came from an irrational mind. It saddens me, though, that these sorts of incidents have not helped enough to start a national conversation about the state of mental health care in the U.S.

    There was an interesting article by David Hillshafer in Skeptic recently regarding gun control. One of the things that Mr. Hillshafer’s statistics show is that people tend to not just wake up one morning insane, and decide to kill. Most of the time, their delusions develop over the course of a year or more. I don’t know that ANYONE would have noticed whether or not Mr. Curtis was potentially dangerous or even irrational, or that any intervention by mental health professionals would have been possible or effective before this incident. But it certainly should be something that ought to be looked at.

  2. Brian
    April 18, 2013 at 2:23 PM

    “The author wrote the conspiracy that began when he “discovered a refrigerator full of dismembered body parts & organs wrapped in plastic in the morgue of the largest non-metropolitan healthcare organization in the United States of America.” ”

    Ummm… what the hell was he doing to find body parts?! I mean… think about it- An Elvis impersonator just “finds” body parts? Probably was stuff for a medical school.. but how did he get involved? One doesnt go a hospital cafeteria, open the soda fridge, and find a couple heads stashed in the back, unless they’re lettuce.

  3. April 20, 2013 at 12:52 PM

    I read in an article somewhere he was clearing the drain and mopping the floor in the morgue when he decided to raid the fridge for a drink. I guess he didn’t realize that a morgue fridge isn’t stocked with Coca-Cola and Jello Pudding.

  4. Kathy
    April 20, 2013 at 6:22 PM

    I have known three people who committed suicide. All three had been under doctors’ care for many years, but it didn’t “save” them. Is there no national conversation about the state of mental health care because so many people think science has no idea how to cure sever mental illnesses? I have my doubts.

  5. April 21, 2013 at 4:10 AM

    @Kathy
    A lot of people are treated for mental illness, and a lot of people are actually helped by that treatment. (I’m in that second category of people who’ve been helped — in my case, It was clinical depression and an anxiety disorder). That said, there are a heck of a lot of bad therapists out there as well. When I was seeking help for myself, the very first person I contacted was an incredible flake. My medical doctor did the best he could, but most GPs are not very knowledgeable about treating mental illness.

    Furthermore, when I finally got a decent psychiatrist, it still took more than a year to find the right drug and dosage that would help without side effects. Later on, a certain drug I was on had actually stopped being effective so I had to start all over again.

    And I understand that this is not unusual. Severe mental illnesses, for the most part, are not ‘curable’, but most are treatable. In my case, the medication that I’ve tried, even when they do work, only serves to take the edge off my anxiety. That, combined with group therapy is enough for me to cope and have a semi-normal life. The medication takes the edge off, and the group therapy teaches me how to deal with stress and not avoid it, how to recognize the triggers of my illness, and keeps me from cutting myself off from everyone in my life like I did when things got really bad.

    Finding ‘cures’ is not a realistic goal. But making sure that people who need treatment, find it, and weeding out the quacks, is.

  6. drwfishesman
    April 24, 2013 at 7:31 AM

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