Questionable claims of monster remains in Lake Labynkyr

I’ll start off with the conclusion. Do not believe a word of this Russian “monster” story. Read on…

Divers find mystery ‘jaws and skeleton’ in Siberia’s ‘Loch Ness’.

A dozen divers braved legends of monsters and the coldest winter temperatures in a venture that is likely to go into the Guinness World Book of Records.

Using an underwater scanner they discovered a jaw and skeletal remains that might be the notorious ‘Devil’ that was first reported by locals in the 19th century, it was claimed on 1 February.

Earlier reports said that top Russian diver Dmitry Shiller,  leader of the Russian Georgraphical Society Underwater Research Team, and his colleagues had reached the bottom and returned without any sign of the legendary monster.

‘Dmitry Shiller did not meet the monster – but managed to film the bottom of the lake and took samples of the lake’s flora,’ said a spokesman.

But later it was claimed the team had found evidence of jaws and a skeleton using an underwater scanner, thought [sic] there was initially scant detail.

We covered the tale of the Labynkyr devil back in September when The Siberian Times reported that  ‘several seriously big underwater objects’ were recorded with sonar readings. If you recall, and I’ll link to a picture again, they DREW the creature they interpreted on the sonar reading. Nevermind that it could be a log or school of fish or a myriad of other things, THEY only interpreted it as a mystery monster creature.

Red ink drawn in. Photo: veslo.ru

Red ink drawn in. Photo: veslo.ru

At that time, I concluded this was a nice ploy to get tourists to visit. They pull this off with the Yeti adventures in Kemerovo region. This new story seems to be the continuation of this very unscientific, non-credible story about a creature suspected to be in the lake. Sure, there could be large animals in the last but that has nothing to do with remains of which we have no pictures. Tell me, how reasonable is to think that they found remains with just “an underwater scanner”? And, admittedly, the details are scant. It very could be a skeleton, or something completely different. In all, this story does NOT hang together as factual or credible.

It was reported on Cryptomundo and several other places but it’s not worth paying attention to until ACTUAL evidence beyond this story can be produced.

By the way, nice of them to throw in the world’s record thing to muddle up the story. That part seems to be related to the cold temperatures of the air (minus 42C and the water 2C).

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  4 comments for “Questionable claims of monster remains in Lake Labynkyr

  1. RDW
    February 2, 2013 at 11:00 PM

    A couple of Sturgeons swimming together might be as much as 30 feet long, and would look sort of monstrous. Although they are a river fish, it wouldn’t be out of the question for there to be some unknown species living in a remote, largely unexplored place like Siberia.

    • oldebabe
      February 4, 2013 at 2:51 PM

      “A river fish”? Mostly, perhaps, but ISTM that there are sturgeon in the Caspian Sea…???

      Definitely, the story is at the very least questionable. One could say, however, that if one saw what they identified as a monster anywhere, someone will believe it, in spite of logic, rationale, or lack of evidence.

  2. oldebabe
    February 4, 2013 at 3:07 PM

    Also, I’m not sure about the photo shown of a gauge, but if from it one determines that the data taken is 54 meters down (over 150 feet?) and at that depth is 15 degrees Centigrade (over 60F?), it’s a rather warm lake…

  3. Sam
    February 4, 2013 at 6:58 PM

    I really think these people need to learn how to read their sonar, or what looks like a cheep fish finder to me.
    I can’t see the scale on the device so they could have it set to 250 meters and the depth read out is 54 meters and why it’s in the upper part of the screen. It could also be a thermal inversion which shows up like that or even a small school of bait fish. Also depending on the speed of the boat it could be just one fish staying in the transducer cone angle for a long period of time.
    I wish I had saved my sonar read out from fishing lake Ontario I could of made all kind of weird claims :)

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