Event: 80 Years of the Loch Ness Monster

Wow. Wish I could attend this.

Nessie at 80 | A Symposium Celebrating 80 Years of the Loch Ness Monster.

As part of the Edinburgh International Science Festival there will be a one day conference celebrating the first modern sighting of the Loch Ness Monster.

Numbers are strictly limited for this unique event to be held on Saturday the 6th of April at The Counting House in Edinburgh (11.30am to 6.30pm) . Tickets are £20 which includes a buffet lunch.

Featured guests include: Adrian Shine, Roland Watson, Paul Harrison, Tony Harmsworth, David Martin-Jones, Charles Paxton, Gordon Rutter and Steuart Campbell.

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  4 comments for “Event: 80 Years of the Loch Ness Monster

  1. Peter Robinson
    January 29, 2013 at 11:50 AM

    Without wishing to be a killjoy I have left the following comment on the site announcing the event:

    Your comment is awaiting moderation.

    How very un-scientific an introduction to your gathering. NO!. Your symposium will not be ‘…a one day conference celebrating the first modern sighting of the Loch Ness Monster.’

    For that statement to be true one has to believe that the witness was reliable, produced some evidence, and what was sighted was indeed an unknown aquatic creature that has gained the popular name of the Loch Ness Monster.

    It will be ‘…one day conference celebrating the first modern suggested sighting of something that almost certainly, due to a complete lack of credible evidence despite vast efforts and resources having been applied to trying to produce such evidence, does not exist but has been given the name Loch Ness Monster.’

    In wording it the way you have you are simply pandering to populist myth in an effort to sell tickets

    Have to say I cannot see why anyone would wish to attend this event. It would be like going to a celebration of Big Foot sightings. Basically to watch some people claim, without a shred of credible evidence, the existence of a mythical creature, and others stating the bleeding obvious i.e. despite huge efforts there is not a shred of evidence. Done deal.

    • January 29, 2013 at 11:55 AM

      I do like to hear from other perspectives. Regardless of the reality of the creature (however we define it because that varies), it certainly has an impact on culture and what people believe. There looks to be a WIDE range of views attending this conference. I’ve read some of these authors and their opinions are varied. That kind of conversation is always interesting.

    • Tulli Monstrum
      January 31, 2013 at 10:22 AM

      Perhaps you should look a little more closely at the backgrounds of who is speaking. If you did you would realise that a variety of views are represented (indeed Nessie non-believers maybe better represented than believers). However even if the Loch Ness phenomena does not have an unknown animal basis, considering why and how people report monsters is of interest. The Loch Ness Monster exists as a reported phenomena and that in itself is interesting. I know the zetetic wing in the skeptical movement has largely been eclipsed (alas) but some of us actually still engage in open-minded investigation!
      I’m one of the organisers, we’re not doing this for profit. If we make a profit we will keep the monies for another event in the future but it would be nice to break even! So buy a ticket Mr Robinson, you will expand your mind, find out how believers and (zetetic) skeptics can usefully collaborate and there is a nice buffet lunch!

  2. Rick
    January 30, 2013 at 11:19 AM

    Considering that during the last Ice Age, Scotland (including Loch Ness) was buried under a mile or 2 of ice, I think it highly doubtful that a marine animal of the reputed size could survive (how would it get there, for one thing); not to mention, what does it eat (the loch is very large & deep, but not terribly fertile), and how is it that no objective signs (bodies, bones, photographs) have ever been found in 80 years of scrutiny? This weekend is Ground Hog Day, and while I don’t believe in the weather prognastications of a fat rodent, at least we know Ground Hogs really do exist ….

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