Measles can kill

I lost my child to measles | Herald Sun.

Immunisation advocate Cecily Johnson takes a photo of her daughter Laine and her death certificate to anti-vaccination meetings to fight their message that “immunisation harms” after Laine lost her life to complications from measles.

Laine should have turned 30 last week, but she passed away in 1995 from subacute sclerosing panencephalitis, an infection related to the measles that left her blind and unable to walk or talk.

It took seven years for the complications from measles to manifest but this is a point that is NOT stressed by anti-vax “facts”. They frequently advocate that measles and other vaccination-preventable diseases are not that bad.

Check out this abhorrent book: Marvelous measles. And cringe. Would you put your child through a preventable suffering especially one that can cause complications? [CDC Measles complications] The vaccination is safer.

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  3 comments for “Measles can kill

  1. Kristen
    December 2, 2012 at 11:40 AM

    I think we have reached this strange place in history where doctors can prevent/cure many illnesses so easily, that people have forgotten that just 50 or 100 years ago they were likely to die from them. So people aren’t afraid of these illnesses like they should be. The people who created vaccines were hailed as heroes for saving so many children from childhood illnesses, but we’ve forgotten the history. Now people take it for granted that their children won’t die from them, and even mistrust the same medical establishment that made that possible. It is tragic an horrible that a woman who lost her child has to spend her life parading it around to try and teach people the simple fact that childhood diseases are devastating, and better off prevented.

  2. Chew
    December 2, 2012 at 12:46 PM

    Well said. The anti-vaxers try to credit improved public health standards developed in the 19th century for preventing all germ disease. They have to ignore the 300+ million who died from smallpox in the 20th century before a vaccine was made for it.

  3. Adam
    December 3, 2012 at 5:00 AM

    What gets me is there are parents who deliberately infect their children with live strains of these diseases. It’s such a clearcut case of child endangerment that their kids should be taken off them and if necessary charges up to and including murder should be pressed on them.

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