Psychic screw up: Claimed missing student would be found alive

Psychic Devastates Dead Student’s Family – Yahoo! News.

Harsha Maddula, a Northwestern University pre-medical student from Long Island, N.Y., went missing Sept. 22, last seen leaving an off-campus party in Illinois. Police and volunteer searchers were unable to find him, but Maddula’s family said reassuring words from psychics had raised their spirits.

Apparently, psychics contacted by the Maddula family’s relatives in India said Harsha was okay and would be found: “He’s still alive. Don’t worry.'”

The next day, however, Maddula’s body was found in Wilmette Harbor near his dormitory. He’d been dead for nearly a week, hidden from searchers in the water between two boats. There was no sign of struggle, robbery, or assault; though toxicology tests are still underway, police believe he was likely the victim of an accidental drowning.

Psychics are notorious for giving people false hope like this. Skeptics end up shouting over and over that psychics DON’T solve crimes, no matter what they brag about. We have so many stories like this…

The article goes on to note that notorious pop psychic John Edward is being called on to do a reading on the Dr. Phil TV show to help in solving a missing person case. One can almost predict how this will go. Shame on you Dr. Phil. And to you so-called psychics, take the test. You OWE it to the world to show this is real or to stop giving people false hope.

Tip: Dave Feltz

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  12 comments for “Psychic screw up: Claimed missing student would be found alive

  1. October 15, 2012 at 9:27 PM

    Interesting, whenever a psychic makes an accurate prediction you never hear about it at this site.

    • October 15, 2012 at 9:28 PM

      And when would that be? Because “accurate” is subjective and used VERY liberally by psychics. When it comes out in the scientific literature, I’ll be SURE to post it.

      • October 15, 2012 at 9:31 PM

        I made an accurate prediction when I predicted that James Randi would lie to get out of my challenge for his publicity stunt million dollars.

        • October 15, 2012 at 10:55 PM

          Oh! That’s YOU? Well, sorry, but this isn’t a forum for you.

        • October 16, 2012 at 12:05 AM

          It makes me so sad whenever I see you pop up, Mr. Perron. I wish you could move on with your life. Angrily skulking around skeptic sites year after year, brooding on your perceived wrongs is neither healthy nor productive. Go live your life! Embrace the things that make you joyful! Don’t sit and wallow in past resentments.

        • October 16, 2012 at 7:40 AM

          Mr. Perron has been blocked. I will not allow this site to become a forum for libelous views or ANYone’s personal vendettas. You can go start your own blog.

          Read the comment policy before commenting.

    • Chew
      October 15, 2012 at 10:08 PM

      Since this site was started it has documented every accurate prediction made by psychics.

    • Rich
      October 16, 2012 at 7:14 AM

      I disagree. I think the moment a psychic makes an accurate prediction (demonstrably and consistently more accurate than would be accounted for by chance) then it’ll not only be on this site but around the world, because by doing so they would have altered fundamentally our understanding of how the whole damn thing works.

      That’s not happened.

  2. Yarro
    October 16, 2012 at 12:53 AM

    Here’s another sad example of “help” by psychics.
    In 1993 18 year old student Tanja Groen disappeared after she left her fraternity in Maastricht (Netherlands) to cycle home – there are no dorms at Dutch universities. Nobody ever saw or heard of her again, despite extensive efforts by the police and the media to find her.
    August 2012 a group of volunteers, led by a dowser/psychic and including an ex-police officer who worked on the case, claimed to know the whereabouts of her bicycle and probably her body.
    The bike was supposed to be at the bottom of a canal.
    Tanja’s parents and the police were skeptical and refused cooperation.
    The group went ahead anyway and enlisted the help of divers. They did indeed find a bike at the bottom of a canal. Which is not so remarkable, there’s hardly a canal in the Netherlands without bikes at the bottom rusting away. They also claimed to have found a large steel pipe that was supposedly used to hide Tanja’s body and weigh it down.
    The case got massive media attention and people were amazed at the find. The dowser/psychic was praised for his efforts.
    The police got involved. The bike and pipe were sent to the Dutch Forensic Institute. Where they quickly concluded that the bike wasn’t Tanja’s. Frame number didn’t match and the postal code that the shop owner – who sold the bike to Tanja – engraved in the frame was not there. Later it was revealed the pipe never contained human remains.
    Of course the dowser/psyschic and his group of helper are now accusing the police of hiding the truth and doing a sloppy job. They will continue their efforts to locate Tanja Groen.

    • One Eyed Jack
      October 16, 2012 at 11:32 AM

      “Of course the dowser/psyschic and his group of helper are now accusing the police of hiding the truth and doing a sloppy job.”

      They’re psychic. They should have seen this coming. ;-)

  3. Phil
    October 16, 2012 at 2:00 AM

    Mr Perron you are free to make a prediction right here. Be specific. How about something easy. This week’s mega lotto numbers.

    • Chew
      October 16, 2012 at 2:18 AM

      Have you seen Perron’s submission for the MDC? WILLIAM PERRON – Computerized Horoscope – JREF Forum

      He set ridiculously absurd conditions. He actually thinks each horoscope has a 50-50 chance of being correct. We’ve all seen the video where Randi gave a college class the same horoscope and asked them to rate it on a scale of 1 to 5. Almost the whole class rated it as a 5. Any criteria that applies to everybody hardly meets his criteria of even chance.

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