Military UFOs secrets revealed Sept 22 at National Atomic Testing Museum

Hmm. Here is something I wish I could attend:

From the The Atomic Testing Museum and the NTSHF page, a special lecture (PDF) on Area 51, Military UFOs: Secrets Revealed.

Tip: The Anomalist

Looks VERY interesting. Can’t help but wonder what this will be about. We’ll follow up if we hear more.

  11 comments for “Military UFOs secrets revealed Sept 22 at National Atomic Testing Museum

  1. Joel Peterson
    September 4, 2012 at 7:51 PM

    I visited the National Atomic Testing Museum while at TAM. The museum proper was fascinating, but the Area 51 special exhibit was a joke. It included a mock-up of the alien from the alien autopsy video and a rough piece of plastic labeled: “What does a reptilian alien’s skin feel like?”

    • Geoff
      September 5, 2012 at 2:28 PM

      Holy crap! And they are “associated with the Smithsonian”. I wonder what the nature of this association is?

      http://www.nationalatomictestingmuseum.org/exhibit-area51.aspx

    • Geoff
      September 5, 2012 at 2:32 PM

      I just sent the “curator” an email.

      Fire at will!

      karen.green@ntshf.org

      • Geoff
        September 5, 2012 at 5:33 PM

        My first note…

        Area 51: Myth or Reality
        Myth or reality? Hello what? Is this a legitimate historical exhibition? What exactly is your “association” with the Smithsonian?

        Ms. Green’s response (probably somewhat canned)…

        The exhibit Area 51: Myth or Reality was created with the help of over 400 of the men who worked on the high-tech programs such as the U-2, the A-12, the YF-12A, and the SR-71 Blackbird. This was the first time many of them talked about the programs and the Area. As for the myth part of the exhibit we explore the reality of the myths of Area 51 and worked with such notable people as George Knapp, 14 time Emmy Winning Reporter and Col. John Alexander. Nonsense – no history, culture, and science and technology.

        Perhaps you should come and see the exhibit ….

        We are the only National Museum in Nevada and an affiliate of the Smithsonian.

        My response to her (with implicit attribution to Joel)…

        Thank you for your response. I commend the actual historical materials. But having them alongside an exhibit on Area 51 detracts from the scholarship of the former and unduly adds to the public’s credulity of the latter.

        George Knapp, despite his other work, was out of his depth on Area 51 and still is if he thinks there is evidence for extraterrestrial visitation there. His reputation on the matter is irredeemably tied to UFO-conspiracy proponent Bill Cooper.

        I am told the exhibit includes a mock-up of an alien autopsy and a rough piece of plastic labeled: “What does a reptilian alien’s skin feel like?” If this is true, it is beneath the standards I associate with the Smithsonian and makes me wonder what you mean by “exploring the reality of the myths”.

        I haven’t visited the museum and hope to when we go to the Grand Canyon next year. I hope to see that the museum is working to educate the public and not resorting to something more akin to a carnival sideshow.

        • Geoff
          September 5, 2012 at 10:30 PM

          OMFG…check out her response…

          Hi Geoff,
          George gave a lecture here in which he named names, cited incidents and other facts that show that indeed he has some very interesting facts about UFOs. Having been to his home and worked with his files I can tell you that George does in-depth research on every story.

          We do indeed have a mock-up of the alien autopsy – one of the myths but before you judge perhaps you should see what we say about it and why it is part of the exhibit.

          As for the alien skin – that is for the children who tour the exhibit – and is part of the childrens area.
          We also have SETI, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, various aviation companies, Dryden Research, NASA, Silent Heroes of the Cold War, and Bigelow Aerospace as part of the exhibit.

          Beneath standards????? Taken out of context maybe – in context is another story. Since you have not been here you might check out our website to see some of what we do…

          • Chew
            September 5, 2012 at 10:36 PM

            “part of the children’s area”??? So they are specifically targeting children with this nonsense???

            Dude, please write the Smithsonian and let them know what idiocy is going on in Nevada.

          • Geoff
            September 5, 2012 at 10:47 PM

            Karen:

            You are really doing a mock-up of the alien autopsy? Are you kidding me? Do you really think that is responsible historical work?

            And the “alien skin”? Sorry. that’s entertainment, not education. And, quite frankly, heinous. Especially since you admittedly are directing it to children.

            Shame. You aren’t a museum by any standard that I would like to recall. Unfortunately, you and others like you are becoming the standard for low bars.

            What is the Smithsonian going to “associate with” next? Ken Ham’s Creation Museum?

            May I ask you what your background is and how you have become qualified to curate a national science museum?

            Regards…Geoff

          • Geoff
            September 5, 2012 at 10:48 PM

            Yeah Chew…unreal!

          • spookyparadigm
            September 5, 2012 at 11:50 PM

            Alright, that’s seriously depressing.

            I’ve updated this blog post on the paranormal in museums, to talk about this case, directing readers to this discussion.

            http://spookyparadigm.blogspot.com/2007/06/museums-embrace-pseudoscience.html

  2. spookyparadigm
    September 5, 2012 at 6:01 PM

    This is increasingly common, the use of foklore, myth, and woo to then promote real science.

    I still like to think it can be done properly. I always point to Monster Talk as an example.

    But increasingly, it seems like museums are not capable of doing it. In this case, John Alexander, but especially George Knapp, says they’re not serious about reality. It’s a step up from Linda Moulton Howe I suppose, but still.

    I comment on a similar case, which turned into a full blown essay, which this fall I’m turning into a presentation at the American Anthropological Association, in the following blog post. I was inspired by the University of Pennsylvania having a Halloween-themed event for young adults, that emphasized hauntings, and included a local paranormal group.

    http://spookyparadigm.blogspot.com/2011/10/ghosts-in-museum-archaeologys.html

    I still like the idea of harnessing this stuff for good, but I’m increasingly skeptical that it can be done without causing more harm.

  3. Geoff
    September 5, 2012 at 10:50 PM

    Who has contact with the Smithsonian?

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