Nat Geo go low with nonsense poll about UFOs

Publicity machine running full bore for the Nat Geo Chasing UFOs show. Now, it includes press for a nonsensical public poll designed to get the answer they want to push their new show.

A third of Earthlings believe in UFOs, would befriend aliens.

Aliens often compete with superheroes, vampires and zombies to top hit movie lists — but more than a third of Americans say UFOs are not a fantasy.

That’s the word from a new National Geographic Channel study finding that 80 million Americans are certain UFOs exist and that one in 10 believe they’ve spotted one.

The results are in: Seventeen percent of Americans don’t believe UFOs exist, 36% think they do, and 48% aren’t sure.

About 79% of those surveyed think the government has kept information about UFOs a secret from the public, and 55% believe there are real-life Men in Black-style agents who threaten people who spot UFOs.

“We wanted the pulse on people’s opinions,” says Brad Dancer, senior vice president of research and digital media for National Geographic. “We wanted to get a sense of how Americans view UFOs, what people believe and how mainstream pop culture may or may not be playing into their opinions on it.”


Tip: CFI’s Morning Heresy

WHOA! Wait. LOOK at that question!
Do you believe UFOs exist?

If someone asked ME that, I would also have to say yes. Of COURSE unidentified flying object are out there. I’ve seen one or more. We can’t possibly know what everything is up there. There are weather devices, piloted aircraft, experimental crafts, unmanned flying devices, flocks of birds, plastic shopping bags, kids toy balloons, chinese lanterns, science experiments, luminous weather phenomena AND deliberate hoaxes… I may not have caught all. But in no way does that mean it’s aliens inside.

I also suspect people were influenced to answer in the affirmative as well. I have no idea how the poll was conducted but garnering public opinion without influencing the result is SUPER tricky to do. You didn’t get the pulse, you got the answer you were looking for. I call shenanigans.

It’s appalling that National Geographic has sunk to the depths of crap television to the likes of TLC (once the LEARNING Channel) and the History Channel (home to everything-is-Nazis conspiracy and Ancient Aliens). Disgraceful. And promotion of UFO pseudoscience will do nothing but increase the popularity of and confusion in this grossly misunderstood topic.

  3 comments for “Nat Geo go low with nonsense poll about UFOs

  1. spookyparadigm
    June 27, 2012 at 6:15 PM

    1.) If History were still the All Nazis All the Time Channel, I wouldn’t watch, but at least the name would match. It is instead the 70% macho and populist channel (even taking, well, antiquing, and flooding it with testosterone and bald guys with goatees, apparently the uniform of basic cable reality shows), and the 30% woo and populist channel (scientists are lame, let’s listen to the communications major with the hair talk about how Jesus is an alien!).

    2.) Here’s more info on the poll, including the methods used for selection.

    http://spaceref.com/news/viewpr.html?pid=37603?utm_source=twitter&utm_medium=socialmedia&utm_campaign=twitterclickthru

    3.) I do wonder if those methods (internet-based) have anything to do with the somewhat weird result that 2/3rds of respondents would favor an Obama-led defense against alien invasion.

    • F 89
      June 27, 2012 at 9:41 PM

      Unfortunately that is exactly what the history channel has become.
      The Ads for the chasing UFO’s show sounds like the tried and true paranormal formula: lots of statements about looking fo the truth, people saying “did you see that” and of course loud exclamations and breathless yelling “OMG, did YOU SEE THAT!?!?”
      Not Watching. National Geographic, How could you?

  2. Taed
    June 28, 2012 at 8:11 AM

    I saw Fox News discuss this for about 60 seconds. The on-screen referred to “36% believe in UFOs” whereas verbally, they said “36% are sure extraterrestrial life exists”. Those are two very different things. Unfortunately, the link to the press release above doesn’t say what the actual question asked was.

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