Man claims he tested time travel as a kid in DARPA’s Project Pegasus

Seattle Attorney Andrew Basiago Claims U.S. Sent Him On Time Travels

A lot of people have a hard time trusting lawyers as it is, but what about one who claims he was part of a secret government time travel program when he was a kid?

Since 2004, Seattle attorney Andrew Basiago has been publicly claiming that from the time he was 7 to when he was 12, he participated in “Project Pegasus,” a secret U.S. government program that he says worked on teleportation and time travel under the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency.

“They trained children along with adults so they could test the mental and physical effects of time travel on kids,” Basiago told The Huffington Post. “Also, children had an advantage over adults in terms of adapting to the strains of moving between past, present and future.”

Basiago said he experienced eight different time travel technologies during his stint in the program. Mostly, he said, his travel involved a teleporter based on technical papers supposedly found in pioneering mechanical engineer Nikola Tesla’s New York City apartment after his death in January 1943.


Source: Huffington Post

Umm, riiiiiight.

He claims that he can be seen in a photograph of Abraham Lincoln at Gettysburg in 1863, dressed in period clothing, and wearing over-sized men’s street shoes. He said he returned to 1863 from 1972 via a plasma confinement chamber located in East Hanover, N.J.

This is the craziest story I’ve heard in a long time. Time travel is currently assumed to be impossible as is teleportation, which he advocates and claims has been used recently to transport U.S. soldiers. Add to that point (bear with me)…we have absolutely no evidence that any of this happened other than stories. Time travel is not that hard to prove! Teleportation? Even easier to prove.

The picture he references? Can’t see a face. A far more logical explanation is he saw the picture and created a story around it. Does he believe it? Maybe. Some people invariably will. But is it true. No.

Ok, now you can laugh. We’re not back to the future yet. Oh, yeah. He’s selling a book too. Sometimes, you just gotta laugh, shake your head, and walk away.

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  5 comments for “Man claims he tested time travel as a kid in DARPA’s Project Pegasus

  1. April 30, 2012 at 1:18 PM

    This is the same individual who claimed a young Barack Obama was one of the test subjects, and teleported to Mars.

  2. luvmyGod4eva
    April 30, 2012 at 1:57 PM

    “Beam me up Scotty…..there’s no INTELLIGENT life on Earth! :)

  3. Massachusetts
    April 30, 2012 at 5:46 PM

    If written well, it wouldn’t be a half-bad novel–if done well.

    Future time travel is certainly possible based on relativistic physics. Backwards time travel–I keep seeing documentaries that claim it kinda sorta might just maybe if XY and Z are just so and you pump in a giant quantum of energy blah blah blah–so I guess that’s, for all practical purposes, impossible.

    I’m not so sure, though, that backwards time travel would be easy to prove, if for the sake of argument a system was devised. I do believe there are theories, proposed by physicists, suggesting that in the event of such an unlikely event, a new time line would be created and subsequent events wouldn’t affect the original one. So if some intrepid chrononaut did get in a photo with Abe Lincoln it wouldn’t be seen by the people “back home.” So, if that were the case, then you probably wouldn’t be able to prove it, at least in so direct and simple a manner.

    But yeah, back to reality–this guy does sound pretty crazy. Unless he’s promoting a new film, website or venture, and then he’d be crazy like a fox I suppose.

  4. F89
    April 30, 2012 at 6:54 PM

    Wait-If he claims this…how could he reasonably maintain his credibility as an attorney?

  5. Massachusetts
    April 30, 2012 at 9:13 PM

    I strongly suspect his credibility as an attorney has been compromised in the eyes of many.

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