Foo Fighters are earth shaking. For realz!

Foo Fighters Rock Auckland.

Fans were unanimous the Foo Fighters rocked Auckland on Tuesday night – now geoscientists agree.

GeoNet data shows an eager crowd of 50,000 caused over three hours of sustained tremors during the Western Springs gig.

According to the geological hazard monitoring system the first vibrations were recorded part-way through supporting act Tenacious D at 7.30pm.

But the biggest shakes started when the Foo Fighters took the stage at 8.20pm, stopping only when the gig ended at 11pm.

…the shaking was equivalent to volcanic tremors that might be felt at Ruapehu or White Island.

The shakes were picked up by monitoring stations at nearby Herne Bay and Eden Park and the correlation in timing with the Foo Fighters set confirms the earth movement was all man-made.

Source: @foofighters on Twitter

I’m resigning all skepticism on this post because this may be my favorite story EVER on this blog. Foo Fighters are the official favorite band of Doubtful News. I am a geologist. These two facts make this story completely awesome. So, rock on, Foos.

Dave Grohl: Rock God

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  4 comments for “Foo Fighters are earth shaking. For realz!

  1. Massachusetts
    December 17, 2011 at 11:20 PM

    1. The original foo fighters were basically UFOs that military pilots reported during WWII, right? Just checking. :)

    2. Speaking of volcanoes, I just saw a documentary about Hawaii, which concluded that the volcanoes there took about 1 million years to form, and their lava shafts extended way down to the bottom of the earth’s mantle, near the crust. Pretty amazing!

    • Massachusetts
      December 17, 2011 at 11:21 PM

      Oops, once again a typo. I meant that the lava shafts extended down to near the earth’s core, not the crust.

  2. Massachusetts
    December 17, 2011 at 11:25 PM

    I’m weak on my geology I guess. I’ve just learned that magma is what we call molten rock under the earth, while lava is the term we use when it erupts and joins us on the surface. So the magma shafts extend to the bottom of the mantle.

  3. Massachusetts
    December 17, 2011 at 11:26 PM

    So, is “molten lava” redundant? People say it all the time, and enquiring minds want to know.

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